HOW DO YOU BREW?

See below our tried and true brew methods...

The Aeropress is unique as it can brew both filter strength coffee and strong espresso with a touch of crema.

Coffee is steeped for 10–50 seconds (depending on grind and preferred strength) and then forced through a filter by pressing the plunger through the tube. 

 

You’ll want your water to be at 89°C, if you don't have a temperature controlled kettle, them let the kettle rest for about a minute after boil.

Fun fact: AeroPress brew has one fifth the acid level of drip brew and one ninth the acid level of French press brew. Easier on a sensitive stomach!

A French press works best with course grind, about the consistency of kosher salt. Finer grounds, when immersed in water, have lower permeability, requiring an excessive amount of force to be applied by hand to lower the plunger and more likely to seep into the coffee. Additionally, finer grounds will tend to over-extract and cause the coffee to taste bitter.

 

It is believed that the optimum time for brewing the coffee is around four minutes. 

 

You’ll want your water to be at 89°C, if you don't have a temperature controlled kettle, them let the kettle rest for about a minute after boil.

Fun fact: French presses are also sometimes used to make cold brew coffee.

The first pour is known as the bloom pour. This pour saturates all of the grounds and helps with an even extraction.This should take between 30-45 seconds.

You should pour in slow and steady spirals to keep things even. 

 

As a general rule, we suggest 15 grams of coffee to 350 grams of water.

 

You’ll want your water to be at 89°C, if you don't have a temperature controlled kettle, them let the kettle rest for about a minute after boil.

 

Little tip: Before you brew, place your filter in the brewer and rinse with hot water. This rinses out the paper residue (which lends a kind of woody taste) 

The good old- fashioned drip machine is more forgiving than other methods as far as precise measurements go. Still, make sure not to overload or skimp.

 

Turn the heat off, stat. Pour overs owe at least part of their superior taste to the fact that they’re brewed and then allowed to settle into their flavour without disruption. Drip coffee, on the other hand, is brewed onto a carafe sitting on a hot element which keeps the coffee at a constant near-boil. You’re safe if your machine has an insulated carafe, but if its glass you should turn the heat off (or better yet, remove the carafe from the heat) as soon as brewing is done.

 

Little tip: Keep your machine clean, inside and out. It may sound like a no-brainer, but calcium deposits and other gunk can make for bitter.

Premium coffee roasted in Naramata, British Columbia.

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